FAST awards $1.6 Million for translational research for Angelman Syndrome in 2015.

The Foundation for Angelman Syndrome Therapeutics (FAST), United States and Australia (AU), are thrilled to announce a $1.6 Million investment in translational research ranging from drug discovery and gene therapy to pre-clinical drug studies in animal models of Angelman Syndrome (AS). This year marks the first year of FAST AU sponsored research funding, as well as the first FAST and FAST AU co-funded research grant. These new awards bring our total investment in AS research to more than $3.83 million since 2011.

FAST’s mission is to advance research towards new treatments and a cure for Angelman Syndrome by investing in both basic and translational research grants.   Our grants go through a rigorous review process by our Scientific Advisory Boards, and are recommended for final funding decisions to the Board of Directors of FAST by the Chief Science Officers, Rebecca Burdine, PhD. (US) and Randal Moldrich, PhD. (AU), respectively.

The majority of our 2015 funding supports and expands the FIRE Initiative (FAST Integrative Research Environment) with the remainder of funds supporting our Grant In Aid program.

2015 FAST Funded Research
Identification and Characterization of Novel Therapeutics for AS

FIRE: FAST Integrated Research Environment

Awarded to:
Anne E. Anderson, M.D. Departments of Pediatrics, Neurology and Neuroscience, Baylor College of Medicine.  $271,619.00

Scott V. Dindot, Ph.D., Department of Molecular and Cellular Medicine, Texas A&M University.  $179,047.00

David J. Segal, Ph.D. Departments of Biochemistry, Molecular Medicine, and Pharmacology, The University California at Davis.  $275,000.00

Edwin Weeber, Ph.D., Department of Molecular Pharmacology and Physiology, University of South Florida.  $245,618.00

Kevin Nash, Ph.D., Department of Molecular Pharmacology and Physiology, University of South Florida.  $157,487.00


Development and Characterization of a Pig Model of AS

Grant-in-Aid

Co-funded by FAST and FAST AU

Awarded to: Scott V. Dindot, Ph.D., Department of Molecular and Cellular Medicine, Texas A&M University.  $201,720.00


RNA binding motifs as therapeutic targets for Angelman Syndrome

Grant-in-Aid

Funded by FAST AU

Awarded to: Joel Mackay, Ph.D., School of Molecular Biosciences, University of Sydney.  $265,619.00


For more details on these grants and other FAST funded research, click here.

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